Constantly questioning our own thinking would be impossibly tedious, and System 2 is much too slow and inefficient to serve as a substitute for System 1 in making routine decisions. • Perspectives on risk highlighting uncertainties instead of probabilities are used as a basis for the discussion. In his book ‘Thinking Fast and Slow,’ he explains in great detail about these 2 systems and how they affect our thinking. We have a Two System way of thinking — System 1 (Thinking Fast), and System 2 (Thinking Slow). By replying to a set of issues/questions, the aim is to generate a list of issues to be further processed using System 2 thinking. According to Kahneman System 1 and System 2 thinking uses different processing within the mind altogether. In recent years, psychologists have proposed a theory of dual systems of the mind: System 1 and System 2. The paper presents a new type of conceptual framing for System 1–System 2 thinking in risk science. Scott Adams is a very successful individual and, in this article, he shared some personal secrets that played a huge role in his personal and professional journey.

• It outlines a method for how to better incorporate System 1 type of thinking in risk assessments and management. Noble Laureate Professor Daniel Kahneman describes mental life as composing of two fictitious characters – SYSTEM 1 and SYSTEM 2. The underlying idea is to focus on the basic features of risk and the issues on which System 2 thinking is conditional, i.e. Recently I stumbled upon a post on WSJ written by Scott Adams who is the creator of the famous comic series Dilbert. K. The method is a checklist-based approach. Of course, the brain is not literally divided like this, but it is a useful analogy: Our System 1 thinking is automatic, quick, intuitive, emotional and reactive; Our System …

The analogy I always use is that of Strength Training in Bodybuilding. System 1 is the intuitive, “gut reaction” way of thinking and making decisions. Systems Thinking – 7 Lessons for Ambitious Endeavors.